Saturday
05. April 2014

Stift Melk - Kolomanisaal

7 p.m. READING/CONCERT: PETER SIMONISCHEK & KLANGFORUM WIEN AND CAMERATA SALZBURG SOLOISTS
Peter Simonischek
Klangforum Wien and Camerata Salzburg soloists
Annelie Gahl (violin)
Rafal Zalech (viola)
Andreas Lindenbaum (cello)
Bernhard Zachhuber (clarinet)
Christoph Walder (horn)
Hsinhuei Huang (piano)

Olivier Messiaen:
Improvisation über Appel Interstellaire für Horn solo aus des canyons aux etoiles (1971-74)

Hermann Hesse :
Im Nebel (1908)
Vergänglichkeit (1919)

Rainer Maria Rilke:
Herbsttag (1902)

Olivier Messiaen:
La grive-musicienne (Singdrossel)
L‘alouette des champs (Feldlerche)
für Klavier solo aus Catalogue d‘Oiseaux (1956-58)

Jean Giono:
Der Mann mit den Bäumen, Teil 1 (1953)

Olivier Messiaen:
Theme et variations für Violine und Klavier (1932)

Jean Giono:
Der Mann mit den Bäumen, Teil 2 (1953)

Krzysztof Penderecki:
Sextett für Klarinette, Horn, Violine,
Viola, Violoncello und Klavier (2000)

In cooperation with Stift Melk & Tischlerei Melk Kulturwerkstatt

29,- / red. 26,-

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PETER SIMONISCHEK & KLANGFORUM WIEN AND CAMERATA SALZBURG SOLOISTS The Man Who Planted Trees

The trees were thriving. Over decades in a barren mountain landscape in the French region of Haute-Provence, a shepherd planted oaks, beeches, and birch trees. The growing forest made the water float and triggered a wonderful chain reaction: Vegetables and flowers flourished; people settled in the former wasteland. “A desert turned into a Holy Land,” the French novelist Jean Giono (1895-1970) writes in his narration “The man who planted trees”: “Man can hold a godlike power” – and create Paradise on Earth. To Peter Simonischek, this narration he is reading in the Kolomani hall of Melk Monastery near the abbey’s little paradisiac garden “has become particularly relevant due to the ever more dramatic status of the environment, an inconclusive climate conference and the exploitation of resources. It is a thoroughly unagitated text about a man who has found a unique way to happiness.”

A little paradise in the southeast of Poland: From the Luslawice plain a forest of Chinese larks, North-American magnolia, Himalaya birches, fir trees, Lebanese cedars, maples from China and American flowering dogwood ascends. For many decades, the composer Krzysztof Penderecki has been planting trees to add to his arboretum by his house. “Trees are like music to me; they put us in a position to complete, to complement, to fulfill ourselves.” A great piece of chamber music by the man who planted trees accompanies the story of a man who planted trees: Musicians of Klangforum Wien and Camerata Salzburg play Penderecki’s sextet. Poems about trees that Penderecki set to music in his 8th symphony and pieces by Olivier Messiaen, who found his refuge to write music in the French Alps – which is also the setting of Giono’s narration –, are planted throughout the evening.