Thursday
05. April 2007

Klangraum Krems Minoritenkirche

LUIGI NONO La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura



Annelie Gahl | violin solo
Karlheinz Essl | sound direction


“Caminantes, no hay caminos, hay que caminar”—this old inscription on a monastery’s wall in the Spanish town of Toledo became the Venice composer Luigi Nono’s motto for his compositions as well as his overall existence: “Wanderer, there are no paths, we make the paths by walking”. In La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura subtitled “Madrigals for several ‘wanderers’ with Gidon Kremer”—the second to last of Nono’s works completed—the violin soloist wanders across the stage and through the auditorium where the single parts of the musical score are allotted to six of eight to ten stands, awarding the theatrical action an uncertain moment of aimless wandering. Also the music itself embodies the search and departure across familiar borders. In February 1988 Nano recorded Gidon Kremer’s violin play: a rich repertoire of improvised sound material, characteristic playing modes, sound excerpts from works by Bach, Beethoven, Schumann, and Brahms, snatches of talk and noise. The recordings were turned into eight soundtracks, which are mixed live by the sound director and projected into the room. The solo voice integrates set music—Nono’s early “Varianti” for violin and ensemble (1957) and Giuseppe Verdi’s “Scala enigmatica” from the “Quattro pezzi sacri”—into differentiated playing techniques and a flexible body of sound of micro intervals. The intuitive parallelism of the two carefully produced parts becomes a living organism: soloist and sound director react upon each other, the sound curves cross like the voices of ancient madrigals… “The room becomes the medium of the sound, both in an acoustic and in a historical dimension.” (Klaus Kropfinger)

To Salvatore Sciarrino, the “exemplary wanderer”, successful composer and student of Nono the work is dedicated to, La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura carries a unique aesthetic metaphor: with the past being reflected through the present (nostalgica), it brings about a creative utopia (utopica); the desire for the familiar becomes the vehicle for the possible (futura) through the medium of distance (lontananza). Nono’s body of sound, which is fanned out into the Krems Minorite Church by the violinist Annelie Gahl and the electronics art-technician Karlheinz Essl, becomes the symbol of the wanderer between the times, of Nono’s consistent search for sound, the synonym for beauty, truth and life.

A project in cooperation with musik aktuell – neue musik in nö


Quote about Nono:
“When he died, I sensed a big hole for the first time in my life, something great was lost … something that had been important … the strength he had to fight for a better society, for a better life … everyone who worked with him could feel it … he was like the sun to offer us a great number of possibilities.”
André Richard, composer, conductor, electronics art-technician


A FILETTA 
Corsican vocal polyphony

Jean-Claude Acquaviva | seconda
Paul Giansily | terza
Jean-Luc Geronimi | seconda
José Filippi | bassu
Jean Sicurani | bassu
Maxime Vuillamier | bassu
Ceccè Acquaviva | bassu

It was in the 1970s when the politically still controversial revitalisation of a sense of national identity on the French island of Corsica led to a unique revival of traditional Corsican music with its manifold, undoubtedly Italian roots. Dorothy Carrington, the doyenne among the island’s chroniclers, says about the interpreters of this archaic vocal polyphony that “they never feel as united within their isolation as during the performances of their traditional music which they have inherited from their forgotten past.”
A filetta has been there from the very beginning: not only were the seven singers around Jean-Claude Acquaviva involved in the revival of the legendary Corsican three-voice a-cappella singing, they have also caused sensations with genre-crossing projects in film, theatre, opera, and dance, and they have already won several prizes for their works.
For Imago Dei, the Corsican vocal ensemble is reanimating traditional liturgical polyphony as well as Gregorian orthodox singings—music full of emotion, untamed spirituality and archaic power.

In cooperation with


© La Lontananza

© La Lontananza

© Jean-Marie Colo

© Jean-Marie Colo

© Kurt Hörbst

© Kurt Hörbst

© Florian Cramer

© Florian Cramer